Experiments with Truth: Analysis

From Pussy Riot to Snowden: the dissident fetish

Nothing tastes better than freedom—except possibly burrata.

One May night, I sat beneath the blue whale at the American Museum of Natural History, nibbling through a four-course dinner at the gala for an Eminent Literary Organization.

This Organization defends persecuted writers from Qatar to Honduras. Founded in 1921, their history glitters. With them, Susan Sontag slugged whiskey. With them, Arthur Miller refused to denounce his Communist friends. They stood in solidarity with Salman Rushdie when the Ayatollah Khomeini called for his death.

The Organization is committed to free expression without borders, a value reflected in its international literary festival. They have conducted a powerful study on the effect of N.S.A. surveillance on U.S. writers.

In countries that lock their critics into jail cells, the Organization’s advocacy saves lives.

Earlier that day, police locked former Occupy Wall Street protester Cecily McMillan into a cell at Rikers.

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