Experiments with truth: 7/29/09

    Greenpeace activists sit in protest after painting "Hazardous Products" on the roof of Hewlett Packard headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif., July 28, 2009.  Greenpeace exposed electronics giant Hewlett Packard for backtracking on its public commitment to eliminate key toxic chemicals in its products by the end of this year. The message, applied using non-toxic children's finger-paint, covered more than 11,500 square feet, or the size of two and half basketball courts.
    Greenpeace activists held a sit-in after painting "Hazardous Products" on the roof of Hewlett Packard headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif., July 28, 2009. Greenpeace exposed electronics giant HP for backtracking on its public commitment to eliminate key toxic chemicals in its products by the end of this year. The message, applied using non-toxic children's finger-paint, covered more than 11,500 square feet, or the size of two and half basketball courts.
    • On Monday morning, one hundred Palestinian children marched from the village of At-Tuwani to a village called Tuba along a path where illegal Israeli settlers have attacked Palestinian children and shepherds, as well as international human rights advocates.


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