The power of one of many

    DSCF0872

    The International Day of Climate Action appears to have gone off as planned, with many journalists calling it the most widespread day of political action in history. The 350.org website is being flooded with photos from around the world and blog updates from the always inspiring Bill McKibben.

    Here in New York City, Eric, Nathan and I attended a march across the Brooklyn Bridge with a few hundred others. Many carried homemade signs and burst into spontaneous chants (like “Ain’t no power like renewable power ’cause renewable power don’t stop).

    We made our presence known to the traffic on both sides of the pedestrian path, but some of us—including one noted scholar of nonviolence—wondered why we weren’t marching up the street blocking the very traffic that’s contributing to climate change.

    Even so, the march was so high-spirited that by the time we gathered for a photo in Brooklyn Bridge Park there was no denying the empowerment we all felt. Knowing we were one of thousands of sizeable actions around the world gave me a tremendous sense of hope that we have the numbers to force the change that’s necessary.

    Now, onward to November 30th!



    Recent Stories

      Unlike the pandemic, nuclear war can be stopped before it begins

      August 4, 2020

      Seventy-five years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the anti-nuclear movement is taking big steps toward abolition.

      • Q&A

      We can’t ‘fix’ policing or prison — but we can decide how to create actual safety

      August 3, 2020

      “Prison By Any Other Name” authors Maya Schenwar and Victoria Law caution against quick-fix solutions and spotlight grassroots abolitionist movement building.

      • Feature

      A century later, the women’s suffrage movement offers a timely lesson on how to win through escalation

      July 30, 2020

      As the 19th Amendment turns 100 amid a summer of mass protest, it’s important to remember the decisive role nonviolent direct action played in hastening its ratification.