Union victory against Hilton in San Francisco

    Over at Working In These Times, Carl Finamore reports that last Thursday, San Francisco Hilton General Manager Michael Dunne:

    …broke from the pack of 59 other hotels still in a contract dispute with 8,000 workers and signed a tentative agreement with UNITE-HERE Local 2 in San Francisco, ending an 18th month labor dispute that has rocked this city.

    The contract settlement—which is subject to a ratification vote this Friday—was reached during negotiations last Thursday, and was finalized over the weekend. It is a four-year agreement, back to August 2009 and forward to August 2013. It provides for continued, fully-paid health benefits, pension improvements, two dollars in total hourly wage increases, and workload reductions.

    […]

    A union leaflet congratulates “everyone whose efforts made this settlement possible, especially the STRIKERS at the Grand Hyatt, Palace, St. Francis, Hyatt Regency, and the Hilton (twice!!). These most militant actions and the countless picketlines, civil disobedience, marches, rallies and delegations are the fuel which power our BOYCOTT machine.”

    […]

    In fact, Hilton Worldwide also reached agreement with workers in Chicago and Honolulu.



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