Experiments with truth: 4/8/11

    • Two people were killed today after Yemeni security forces fired at protesters in the southern Yemeni city of Taiz, leaving more than two dozen others wounded. On Wednesday, hundreds of thousands of people marched through the streets of Taiz in ongoing protests against President Ali Abudullah Saleh.
    • Syrian security forces killed at least 15 demonstrators today in the southern city of Daraa, amid fresh protests against the rule of Bashar al-Assad. Similar protests erupted in the western port city of Latakia, Tartus, Baniyas, Homs- near the Lebanese border – and in Edlib, in the northwest of the country.
    • Around 7,000 Palestinian prisoners launched a one-day hunger strike yesterday to protest the Israeli Prison Service’s (IPS) treatment of them and their families.
    • Around 5,000 Turkish Cypriot union members staged another protest on Thursday in divided Cyprus’ breakaway north against austerity measures they say Turkey is saddling them with.
    • More than 500 Jordan Water Company (Miyahuna) employees staged a sit-in on Thursday, the second in a month, demanding that the management improve their living conditions.
    • In Zambia, unionized Workers at Nkwazi Primary School in Lusaka staged a sit in protest yesterday to demand improved conditions of service.

     



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