Thousands surround British nuclear weapons factory in seven-mile-long ‘peace scarf’

    Thousands of people staged a massive protest in the United Kingdom when they surrounded a nuclear weapons factory with a “peace scarf” to advocate for nuclear disarmament.
    10524610_945919348767017_3214159396541476745_n
    Thousands surrounded a nuclear weapons complex in the United Kingdom to call for disarmament earlier this month. (Wool not Weapons)

    Earlier this month, thousands of people staged a massive protest in the United Kingdom in which they surrounded a nuclear weapons factory complex in Berkshire with a “peace scarf” to advocate for nuclear disarmament.

    The action drew such immense turnout that it took five hours to assemble the wool peace scarf, which ultimately stretched for more than seven miles. The thousands of people who took part in making and putting together the scarf were from across the U.K. and beyond. This protest was a response to the government’s plan to renew the Trident nuclear weapons program in 2016.

    The action was coordinated by three U.K.-based groups: Wool Against WeaponsAction Atomic Weapon Eradication, and Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. Jaine Rose, the founder of Wool Against Weapons, connected the renewal of the Trident nuclear program to the violence in Gaza that has sparked massive protests over the last month. “We are seeing at the moment people are horrified at the escalating violence in Gaza. This is a time for people to have a voice to say no to violence and for countries to find other ways to create peace,” she stated.

    Following the action, the scarf was broken down into blankets to donate to homeless shelters in the United Kingdom, an action that also seeks to connect the disarmament struggle to other movements, particularly the anti-austerity struggle in the U.K. The renewal of the Trident program is expected to cost the government about 100 billion pounds at a time that the government is imposing severe cuts to public funds and welfare programs. Organizers are hopeful, therefore, that this action will help draw attention to the multi-faceted damage that would be caused by the development of and investment into renewing nuclear weapons programs in the United Kingdom



    Recent Stories

    • Q&A

    The clash between history and today’s movements — a conversation with Rev. James Lawson

    October 21, 2021

    Called the “architect of the nonviolent movement in America” by John Lewis, Rev. James Lawson discusses the roots and power of nonviolence.

    • Analysis

    Water protectors show that ‘another world is possible’ — through resistance and care

    October 19, 2021

    During a week of action with over 600 arrests, water protectors occupying the Bureau of Indian Affairs showed that caring for one another is directly connected to caring for the Earth.

    • Feature

    Why activism needs to be part of any meaningful climate education

    October 12, 2021

    Simply teaching kids about the science of the climate crisis isn’t enough. To prevent feelings of disempowerment, they need to see how they can make a meaningful impact.