Dumpster diving as civil resistance

    I’ve never tried dumpster diving for food. While I’m intrigued by the idea, it honestly also scares me a bit. After watching a trailer (above) for a new 45-minute movie on the subject, called Dive!, Ryan Rodrick Beiler somewhat reluctantly discusses what has become his “primary (and free) food source,” in an interesting post on Sojourners’ blog. In it, he describes dumpster diving as an act of nonviolence and talks about his reasons for starting to dive in the first place:

    Rescuing food from the landfill is both a delight and a duty. The amount of food that’s routinely discarded is overwhelming in both quantity and quality — almost magically so. And with the waste from the business of food production and distribution feeding our landfills better than many of our citizens, dumpster diving is one act of nonviolent civil resistance against the excesses of our corporate food chain.

    If any of you have tried dumpster diving, let us know about your experience with it and whether you view it through the lens of nonviolence.



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