From the Tar Sands Action to Moving Planet

    Here’s a moving video summary of the two-week Tar Sands Action that ended last Saturday. Of course, it didn’t really end—just “phase one.” As last mentioned on this blog, Bill McKibben and the other organizers are planning something big on October 7th or 8th, when the State Department has its final hearing on the pipeline.

    Speaking of moving things, McKibben’s other activist outlet, 350.org, will be launching its next international day of action on September 24 with a worldwide rally called Moving Planet. They are expecting thousands of events around the world of people delivering a climate message on foot, skates, bike, boat—really anything that moves and doesn’t spew carbon into the atmosphere.

    Judging by 350’s last couple of global actions, it will no doubt be visually stunning. More importantly, though, given the teeth that sprouted outside the White House a few weeks ago, it may also be more than just awareness raising. As McKibben wrote in his invitation to Moving Planet back in April:

    Our friends in Tunisia, Egypt, and throughout the Middle East have proven that change can come quickly. The greatest achievements have been without violence, but not without sacrifice. They’ve done it with bravery, and also good humor; with the internet and also with face-to-face organizing. They’ve got things unstuck in countries that seemed rusted shut. They’re our inspiration for the months ahead.



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