Cross-class coalition-building at Columbia University

    What does it take to organize across class lines? Students and workers at college campuses are increasingly having to find out.

    What does it take to organize across class lines? In the context of a nationwide revival of both labor struggles and student movements, students and workers at college campuses are increasingly having to find out. At Columbia University, students recently started to back a group of Faculty House workers who are fighting for a new contract. But what does solidarity mean at a university where students pay up to $60,000 a year, while campus workers can barely make ends meet? We hear from Osmond Cousin, who has been working as a chef at Columbia for the past 18 years, as well as Jane Brennan, an anthropology student who is one of the main organizers of the student-worker solidarity group. Cousin and Brennan share insights into how both groups have been building alliances in order to increase pressure on the university.



    Recent Stories

    • Feature

    Community peacemakers in Chicago offer a proven alternative to policing

    July 14, 2020

    As calls to defund police grow, peacemakers on the frontlines of Chicago’s gun violence epidemic have dramatically reduced homicides and shootings.

    • Analysis

    Inside the sudden, rising wave of military and veteran dissent

    July 9, 2020

    A new generation of antiwar veterans is beginning to set itself apart in its opposition to America’s wars abroad and at home.

    • Analysis

    5 lessons from the K-pop fans who fizzled Trump’s Tulsa rally, and the Black organizers who led the way

    July 3, 2020

    As K-pop fans and Black organizers and artists are demonstrating, joyful, powerful movements draw more people in and reflect the kind of world we want to live in.