Peace grannies target war toys in Brooklyn

    On December 18, a group of about 20 women who are members of the wonderful Granny Peace Brigade and the Raging Grannies participated in a creative protest against the sale of toys that promote war and violence at a Target store in Brooklyn. According to a recap on the action by Joan Wile, who is a Peace Granny herself:

    Although warned by the police earlier in the day to not attempt to conduct any mischief inside TARGET, the grannies nevertheless “invaded” the store at approximately 4 p.m. and quickly went to the toy department where they filled up four carts and some baskets with the most violent toys ever conceived.

    The grannies then rode them down the escalator while unfurling many bright yellow banners imprinted with the black letters, “WAR IS NOT A GAME” and “NO MORE WAR TOYS.” As they rode down to the next floor, they sang the famous John Lennon refrain, “Give Peace a Chance.” 

    […]

    Once outside, on Flatbush Avenue, the grandmothers opened their special songbooks and sang a number of Christmas carols which the women have revised with lyrics pleading that people not buy war toys. For, instance:

    HARK, THE HERALD ANGELS SING
    HARK, THE HERALD ANGELS SING
    NOW, AT LAST, LET FREEDOM RING.
    PEACE ON EARTH AND MERCY MILD,
    NATIONS MUST BE RECONCILED.
    LET US PUT THE BOMBS AWA-A-Y!
    BRING OUR TROOPS HOME, NOW, TODA-A-Y
    WARS ARE NOT FOR TOYS, OR A GAME.
    DON’T TEACH OUR KIDS TO KILL AND MAIM!
    GIVE THE CHILDREN TOYS OF PEACE,
    HELP THEM TO LEARN THAT WARS MUST CEASE.

    Passersby stopped to enjoy the concert, and many told the grandmothers that they agreed with them. The protesters gave out hundreds of leaflets listing appropriate toys for parents to buy rather than the horrendous ones glorifying lethal battle. 

    This action was the second in the grannies’ recently launched campaign called “NO MORE WAR TOYS, NO MORE WARS.” The first took place on December 4, at the massive Toys “R” Us store in Times Square, and was apparently very well received by passers-by as well. For more on that protest, including pics and a video, see here and here.



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