Journey of Repentance chronicled in new documentary

    In the summer of 2009, an 18-person interfaith delegation from Tacoma, WA came together to organize a trip to Japan to interact with atomic bomb survivors as a means to resist nuclear weapons. Their trip also coincided with the 64th anniversaries of the atomic bombings. To help publicize their journey and continue the spirit of reconciliation after the trip, the Journey of Repentance decided to have a documentarian follow them while on their trip. I was that lucky documentarian tasked to prepare and direct the international production.

    Once filming had completed, the Journey of Repentance persuaded me to continue working on the film in the editing room. The result was Free World, a 38-minute film that documents the group’s history of civil resistance to the nuclear weapon stockpile in the Puget Sound of Washington state, as well as their interactions with the Hibakusha in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    The filmmakers and the Journey of Repentance invite you to watch the film to learn more about what this group boldly set out to do to help the disarmament movement along. If you have already seen the film, you have already taken a step toward a world free of nuclear weapons. Thank you for this first step, but please do not let it be the last.

    To purchase a DVD or Public Screening Package please visit www.freeworlddocumentary.com.



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