Learn civil resistance for three rigorous credits

    Civil Resistance and the Dynamics of Nonviolent Conflict” is a fully online academic course on civil resistance, a joint project of Rutgers University and the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. The organizers are now admitting perspective participants.

    The course will run from Monday, April 23 to Tuesday, June 5, 2012, and it will involve a mixture of both live, synchronous activities at scheduled times (webinars, live chats and Skype conversations) and asynchronous activities to be completed within specified time frames (forum posts, short quizzes, readings and videos). The course will provide an in-depth and multi-disciplinary perspective on civilian-based movements and campaigns that defend and obtain basic rights and justice around the world through nonviolent tactics and strategies — from Egypt to Burma, to Zimbabwe and West Papua. We will look at issues of agency and structure, strategic planning and mobilization, democratic transitions and civil resistance, backfire and security divisions, digital actors and tools, the role of third party actors, and, finally, historical and contemporary cases of civil resistance around the world.

    Perspective applicants may also register for and earn up to three graduate credits awarded by Rutgers University. Apply here.



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